Small Business Information You Need to Know

Are you thinking about starting up a small business sometime in the near future? There are a few things that you will want to know before you open your doors for the customers to come in. If you try to start a business large or small without first having all of the facts about that business you may not be as successful as you hoped you would be. You will want to take the time to make sure that everything is in order before you put your small business plan into effect.

One of the first things that you will want to make sure that you have is a small business license. Every business large or small has to have a license to operate in the county that they are located in. You will have to go to the court house in your county and inquire about purchasing a business license before you can actually call yourself a business. You will have to give them your business name and pay the required fee.

Next, you will want to make sure that you have a small business bank account so that you can keep all of your business finances in order. You do not want to get your business revenue mixed up with the grocery money from your personal account and it can be a big mess to straighten everything out if you go too long without establishing a separate account for your small business. It will also be helpful for you to start building a business relationship with the people at your bank so that you will have an easier time getting approved for loans when you need them.

Another thing that you will want to know about before you start your business is online marketing. By taking the time to sit down and learn some basic information about internet marketing you will be able to reach out to customers from across the world that want to do business with you. These are customers that you would not otherwise have the opportunity to do business with and are ones that will be very valuable to you once you start.

There is several other information that you will want to know about a small business before you start one up. It is not as easy and glamorous as most people try to make it out to be. You will need to do a lot of planning and make sure that you have everything that you need in order to be successful. You can make it if you have everything organized before you open your doors.

The Importance of Comprehensive Business Information Services

Imagine this situation, you have been staffed with the responsibility of performing due diligence for your organization. Where do you start? What types of research will you need to perform? What type of public record verifications will you need to conduct to protect your brand’s value?
Business information can take many forms. An organization’s ability to access information can be a critical component to having an ability to mitigate fraudulent patterns. Knowing the individuals and organizations you are doing business with is essential.
The Need for Due Diligence:

Consider the risk of potential exposure during the most simple of business transactions. To help mitigate exposure companies must rely on a series of public record sources. Today’s business world occurs in a fast pace environment. There is a strong need to have a complete due diligence solution that is flexible enough to keep pace with the fast demand for information. Below is an example of on demand due diligence services for domestic and international searches:

– Lawsuits

– Judgments

– UCC Filings

– Watch List Searches

– Media Publication Searches

– Bankruptcy Records

– Tax Liens
Comprehensive business information research involves a variety of channels. Information can be acquired through several types of searches and verification methods. Consider the need for credentials verification. Verification can occur against a variety of individual and organizational credentials including:

– Professional Licenses

– Insurance

– Corporate Status

– Diversity Status

– Business Locations

– Sanctions
Another type of verification is identity verification. Companies focused on performing identity verification will want to be conscious of the following types of verifications:

– Social Security Verification

– DOB Verification

– Address Verification

– Business Tax ID

– Business Affiliations

– Watch List Review
Creating a Complete Due Diligence Solution:

Due Diligence is about having access to the right information when you need it. If you need to find public records, or perform an id authentication then you’ll need to turn to a variety of public record sources. In the fast paced environment of today’s business world having access to single platform can significantly decrease the time needed conducting due diligence. Here’s how a complete due diligence solution works.

– Critical documents are retrieved by document retrieval specialists from courthouses (federal, state and county) and Secretary of State Searches relative to bankruptcies, lawsuits, liens, judgments and more.

– The above searches are combined with supplemental information such as corporate entity verification, watch list searches, media publication searches and UCC filing searches.
Information to Make Well Informed Decisions:

When information is able to be gathered under a single platform the ability to make well informed decisions becomes easier. Spending the time to individually perform the searches discussed in this text can be time consuming and expensive to implement. By looking to outsource the research process and integrate the results under a single platform you are performing the needed due diligence with increased speed and efficiency. More important by reaching out to a team of nationally trained document retrieval specialists you are allowing your organization to leverage the skill set and effectiveness of a dedicated staff that can provide you with the on demand public record searches that are essential to your organizations need to verify information about the individuals and organizations you are conducting business with.

Work at Home Business Information and Resources

Want to work at home? Doesn’t everyone? Being your own boss has become a realized dream for millions of stay-at-home moms and dads, accountants, architects, contractors, pet sitters, and so many others.

Workers in many walks of life have taken the further step of starting their own businesses, and operating out of their own homes. Getting rid of the 9-to-5 job is great, but then what? Where do you start?

What product or service can you sell? How do you make contacts when you work at home? For your desk, chair and organizers. First, you have to figure out what you want to do with your computer and who will use it. Second, determine where you want your computer to live and how much space you’ll allocate to this activity.

There are many resources today–books, websites, and organizations–that provide information and assistance for startup businesses. You will be joining millions of others who enjoy the freedom to make their own work arrangements.

Your workplace may now consist of the room your computer is in. Your dress is, to say the least, casual, and your hours are whatever you choose. Some companies do the legwork so you can devote more quality time to your work at home.

Lead generation companies may charge a setup fee, perhaps from $50 to $200 a year, and charge about $5 to $25 per lead. This charge is dependent on how difficult it is to get the lead.

Taking a course in selling and marketing online or from a local community college may help you to close the sales that are generated by leads when you work at home.

Keep Your Business Information Quiet: Loose Lips Sink Companies

We have this idea that computer hackers are ingeniously bright people. We hear stories, true or otherwise, as to how they seem to finagle valuable information from us, using the most sophisticated social engineering techniques. In reality, they often use such tricky questions as, “I’m calling from the IT Department. We’re doing some system checks on your T-3 line. I’ll need to reprogram your current password with a new one. You’re using the one that’s all letters, right?”

And so we dutifully comply with what seems to be a reasonable and logical request from some resident authority figure who surely has our best interests in mind. Often within minutes, we will reveal confidential company or personal information, over the phone, or through an email reply to a complete stranger who talks or writes a good line.

Reading all this and reflecting on your own sense of eternal security vigilance, you’ll swear that you’d never give out a byte of confidential or important data, over the phone, across cyberspace, or even face-to-face. Your motto is: “Hang me up by my thumbs for a week and I still wouldn’t even tell you my first name.”

And all this may be true when you believe the information requester may be a wolf in sheep’s leggings, but how about when the asker-to-be is from your local or national news media? Are you still tight-lipped and careful, or do you get caught up in the glow of the First Amendment’s pad and pen, the video camera, or the microphone? It’s hard for even savvy security professionals not to spill some beans when faced with the often flattering request for information and a chance to demonstrate subject matter expertise.

But just as loose lips sink ships, the desire to provide information to the media must be measured by the impact, or more accurately, the harms a few words or figures can betray.

Several years ago, the Business section of the Orange County (Calif.) Register, featured a two-page photo spread on the history of the Southland Corporation’s reason for being: the 7-11 store. Along with a history of the Big Gulp business, the piece featured an interview with Anaheim 7-11 franchisee Herb Domeño, owner of nine stores, including the site at Katella and Harbor. For those not familiar with southern California real estate, this prime property is directly adjacent to an Enchanted Kingdom knows as Disneyland.

Back then, Mr. Domeño’s stone’s throw-to-Disneyland convenience store boasted the highest sales volume in the country – an average of $3 million per year, clearly above the national sales-per-store average of about $1.3 million per year.

Taking out our trusty calculators, we could have determined that, give or take some up or down days in the boom-boom 1990’s, Mr. Domeño’s enterprise took in about $8,000 per day.

And how did we discern this figure? It’s easy to uncover, especially when the $3 million sales amount is featured boldly in the photo caption of Mr. Domeño in his cash-cow store. (By the way, the new national sales record for one 7-11 convenience store belongs to the folks running the show in Southampton, NY.

So what has the Orange County Register just told every enterprising convenience store robber who can read? This place is full of cash and even if they aren’t cleaning up like they did before Disneyland closed a nearby parking lot to make room for its California Adventure addition, Mr. Stickup Artist has to believe it’s worth a shot.

Even if the daily revenue figure is adjusted for slow days and customers who pay with debit or credit cards, it’s still a substantial amount of cash that is either on the premises or being moved, via some safe means we hope, to the bank.

In times of organizational crisis, it’s wise to have a designated member of the executive team speak to the print or TV media. This person will have the training, experience, and savvy to say the right things, at the right times. News gatherers, on the other hand, won’t always seek out your Director of Corporate Communications (or similarly-titled representative). If they want the juicy details, any gossip, or the “inside story,” they might go to any executive or manager they can find, or worse, to an employee, who gives an opinion as if it was a fact.

In a perfect world, the security professional would also be part of the discussion and review of any press release, placed article, or editorial coming from the organization that has any security-related content. “Facts and figures” statements tossed out like: “Our security system is so sophisticated it only takes one guard per eight-hour shift to operate it,” or “Our jewelry store revenues have never been higher” might be great PR, but they can turn your business into a new target, by people or groups who never considered it as one before.

If you’re tasked with speaking to a media member about any aspect of your business operations or performance, choose your words carefully. Use the technique every politician is trained in from birth: bridging. Bridging simply requires you to “bridge over” to the question you want to answer versus the question you’re asked.

This approach works best when you’re asked the question you don’t really want to answer, i.e. Reporter: “Isn’t it true that your firm’s movement to stricter access control has created a `prison camp environment’ for your employees and customers?” Security Professional: “As you know, our approach has always been to put the safety and security needs of our people and our customers first. As such, we believe in creating the best working environment possible…”

Get the idea? You don’t answer a direct, confrontive question with a direct, assertive answer on point. You vary the response to make sure you cover your points, not theirs.
When in doubt, choose to be bland, especially with any information that hints of having a financial, proprietary, or trade-secret connection. “We’ve got a good handle on our inventory” sounds so much better than, “We’ve got a ton of expensive stuff laying around our warehouse.”

The old adage all publicity is good publicity has its exceptions. Better for people to read about your firm and have to make assumptions about your security, than to know too much detail.